Anzac Day 2018 Dawn Service and Gunfire Breakfast 6am Buchan South Avenue of Honour

5.55am  Gather at the Avenue.  Flag at half-mast.

6.00am “STAND TO” & Welcome

Guest Speaker: Bairnsdale RSL

Anzac Prayer

“The Ode”

Last Post

One Minute Silence

Reveille and flag raised to masthead

National Anthem

6.30am  All invited to the “GUNFIRE BREAKFAST BARBEQUE”

 ($5 PER PERSON, children FREE) and to stay on afterwards, or come back if you wish, for the 10am Service – see 10am Anzac Day March programme

Lest We Forget

Anzac Day 2017 Tuesday 25th April, 2017 Dawn Service 6am and a later service at 10am

Dawn Service & Gunfire Breakfast (BBQ)

5.45am   Gather at the Avenue.  Flag at half-mast.

6.00    “STAND TO” & Welcome

6.05     “For King And Country”

6.10       Guest Speaker –

6.20      Song For Grace

6.25   “The Ode”

Last Post

One Minute Silence

Reveille

National Anthem

6.30   All invited to the “GUNFIRE BREAKFAST BARBEQUE”

($5 PER PERSON, children FREE) and to stay on afterwards, or come back if you wish, for the 10am Service – see 10am Anzac Day  programme

Lest We Forget

Later Service

10.00am      *Flag at half mast

Welcome and short address

Song

* Guest speaker: East Gippsland Shire Councillor

* Guest speaker:  Dorathy Chiron

* Buchan Primary School Students

* Song

Placing of the Wreaths

*Ode

*Last Post

*One Minute Silence

*Reveille and Flag raised to the masthead by TBC

Song “Advance Australia Fair”

*Morning Tea

PLEASE BRING ALONG MORNING TEA TO SHARE.

 

Remembrance Day Friday 11th November 2016

 PROGRAM  

10.15 Gather at the Buchan South Avenue of Honour.

          Flag at half-mast.

10.25 Welcome by Zillah Norfolk

10.30 Guest Speaker

10.30 Song

10.40 Guest Speaker – Dorothy Chiron

              ‘A Letter from a Soldier’

10.45 Buchan Primary School

10.50 Placing of wreaths.

10.55 ‘The Ode’

           The last Post

            One Minute Silence

            Reveille.  Flag raised to masthead by a School Leader

NATIONAL ANTHEM

MORNING TEA (Contributions to morning tea are very welcome.)

 

Remembrance Day 2015

Poster

Paul Hunters… Poem of Remembrance

I am not a badge of honour,
I am not a racist smear,
I am not a fashion statement,
To be worn but once a year,
I am not glorification
Of conflict or of war.
I am not a paper ornament
A token,
I am more.

I am a loving memory,
Of a father or a son,
A permanent reminder
Of each and every one.

I’m paper or enamel
I’m old or shining new,
I’m a way of saying thank you,
To every one of you.

I am a simple poppy
A Reminder to you all,
That courage faith and honour,
Will stand where heroes fall.

Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae… In Flanders Fields

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place: and in the sky
The larks still bravely singing fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.
We are the dead: Short days ago,
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved: and now we lie
In Flanders fields!
Take up our quarrel with the foe
To you, from failing hands, we throw
The torch: be yours to hold it high
If ye break faith with us who die,
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields
Composed at the battlefront on May 3, 1915
during the second battle of Ypres, Belgium

Rememberance Day 2015(2)  Rememberance Day 2015

Anzac Day 2015

Saturday 25th April

100th anniversary of the ANZAC landings at Gallipoli

5.45   am                     Dawn Service

6.30   am                     GUNFIRE BREAKFAST BBQ   ($5 PER PERSON, CHILDREN FREE)

10.00 am                     Service              

PLEASE BRING ALONG MORNING TEA TO SHARE.

Lest We Forget

Photos Geoff Stanton Photography www.facebook.com/GeoffStantonPhotography

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Lee Kernaghan – “Spirit of the Anzacs” charity single featuring Guy Sebastian, Sheppard, Jon Stevens, Jessica Mauboy, Shannon Noll and Megan Washington is out now! Taken from Lee’s upcoming album ‘Spirit of the Anzacs’ coming soon.

5000 Poppies

From its association with poppies flowering in the spring of 1915 on the battlefields of Belgium, France and Gallipoli, the poppy has become a symbol of both great loss in war and hope for those left behind.

As part of the 2015 Anzac Commemoration, and the 5000 Poppies project we will be displaying hand knitted and crocheted poppies at the Buchan South Avenue of Honour this year as a visual tribute to Australian servicemen and women for more than a century of service in all wars, conflicts and peacekeeping operations.

We are inviting all crafters to participate in this meaningful and heartfelt project.

Knitting and Crochet Patterns

“And The Band Played Waltzing Matilda”

– Eric Bogle

Now when I was a young man, I carried me pack, and I lived the free life of a rover
From the Murray’s green basin to the dusty outback, well, I waltzed my Matilda all over.
Then in 1915, my country said son, It’s time you stopped rambling, there’s work to be done.
So they gave me a tin hat, and they gave me a gun, and they marched me away to the war.

And the band played Walzing Matilda, as the ship pulled away from the quay
And amidst all the cheers, the flag-waving and tears, we sailed off for Gallipoli
And how well I remember that terrible day, how our blood stained the sand and the water
And of how in that hell that they called Suvla Bay, we were butchered like lambs at the slaughter.
Johnny Turk he was waiting, he’d primed himself well. He shower’d us with bullets,
And he rained us with shell. And in five minutes flat, he’d blown us all to hell
Nearly blew us right back to Australia.

But the band played Waltzing Matilda, when we stopped to bury our slain.
We buried ours, and the Turks buried theirs, then we started all over again.
And those that were left, well we tried to survive, in that mad world of blood, death and fire
And for ten weary weeks, I kept myself alive, though around me the corpses piled higher
Then a big Turkish shell knocked me arse over head, and when I woke up in my hospital bed,
And saw what it had done, well I wished I was dead. Never knew there was worse things than dyin’.

For I’ll go no more waltzing Matilda, all around the green bush far and free
To hump tent and pegs, a man needs both legs-no more waltzing Matilda for me.
So they gathered the crippled, the wounded, the maimed, and they shipped us back home to Australia.
The legless, the armless, the blind, the insane, those proud wounded heroes of Suvla
And as our ship pulled into Circular Quay, I looked at the place where me legs used to be.
And thanked Christ there was nobody waiting for me, to grieve, to mourn, and to pity.

But the band played Waltzing Matilda, as they carried us down the gangway.
But nobody cheered, they just stood and stared, then they turned all their faces away
And so now every April, I sit on me porch, and I watch the parades pass before me.
And I see my old comrades, how proudly they march, reviving old dreams of past glories
And the old men march slowly, old bones stiff and sore. They’re tired old heroes from a forgotten war
And the young people ask, what are they marching for? And I ask myself the same question.

But the band plays Waltzing Matilda, and the old men still answer the call,
But as year follows year, more old men disappear. Someday no one will march there at all.
Waltzing Matilda, Waltzing Matilda, who’ll come a-waltzing Matilda with me?
And their ghosts may be heard as they march by that billabong, who’ll come a-waltzing Matilda with me?

 

Anzac Day 2014

The Dawn Service was held at 6am with the temperature at 6 degrees Celsius, the coldest night so far this year.  Clive Norfolk called the “Stand To” and Jeff Mc Cole read The Ode.  East Gippsland Shire Council Deputy Mayor Peter Neal was our guest speaker who recounted the story of the origin of The Last Post.  The flag was raised and all were invited to the gunfire breakfast cooked by Jamie Houghton and Danny Mitton.  Approximately 70 people attended this service.
A beautiful day transpired with the sun streaming into the avenue and the parrots coming from the flowering gums in the street to feast on the acorns in the avenue.
At the later service we had the RAAF contingent from Sale East attend this year and march along King’s access road being lead by our veterans Jeff Mc Cole and Clive Norfolk.  The welcome was presented by the new Avenue of Honour President Evelyn Schmidt.  The ceremony was presented by the outgoing President Zillah Norfolk.
“Let there be peace” was played and then Councillor Peter Neal presented his address.  The address by the RAAF OTS Student was given by Officer Cadet Nelson Mirus.  The OTS Staff guest speaker was Squadron Leader Fiona van Der Snoek and the Wreath laying for the RAAF OTS was completed by  Flight Lieutenant Sue Stone.
Grade 6 students from Buchan Primary School participating in the Rotary Community Awards introduced themselves and Jessica Houghton spoke about her 5th generation connection to the Buchan South Avenue of Honour.  Ian Dunkley from the Buchan and Gelantipy Racing Club presented a $1000 cheque to the Avenue of Honour Committee.
Jeff once again recited The Ode, The Last Post was played, one minute silence, reveille and the flag raised by Jessica.  Advance Australia Fair played and then everyone enjoyed morning tea.
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Anzac Day 2013

 

Dawn Service 0545 – Gather at the Avenue -Old RSL flag at half mast 0600 – “Stand-To” and brief welcome by Clive Norfolk 0605 – Guest Speaker – Kevin Kneebone 0615 –  Hymn – Abide With Me 0620 – Prayer – Speaker  – Cassandra White, Rotary Award Student 0625 – The Ode, Last Post, 1 min silence, Reveille (Flag raised to masthead by Cassandra White)  and National Anthem 0630 – Cup of Tea.

 

 

BUCHAN PONY CLUB SERVICE Blue Ensign at half mast 08.30 Service at the Pony Club Venue  (Rec. Reserve) -note early time 0830 – Horses proceed through designated parade and assemble in front of the Rec Hall. 0840 – Welcome by Zillah Norfolk 0843 – Special Address – History of the Australian Lighthorse – guest speaker – to be advised. 0900 – The Ode – spoken by Jeff Mc Cole. Followed by The Last Post, 1 min silence, Reveille (Flag raised to masthead by Cody Woodgate) the National Anthem.

 

10.55 – AVENUE OF HONOUR WREATH LAYING Welcome by Zillah Norfolk-  Lay wreaths, Last Post, one minute silence, Reveille, National Anthem, finishing approx 11.05am.

 

OLIVER JACK POULTON Oliver Jack Poulton, a 21 year old farmer, fair with blue eyes, left his home in Turner’s Flat, McLeay River New South Wales, to enlist in the army. His mother Fanny Louise and his father John signed his enlistment papers for service abroad. Oliver signed up for the duration of the war plus four months, at Kempsey New South Wales, on April 25th 1917. (Coincidentally that is now Anzac Day.) He passed his medical examination and was ‘dentally finalized’ by June 1917. He was appointed to the 6th Lighthorse on June 18 at Menangle Park, and later to B Company 25th reinforcements 4th Battalion. Private Oliver Poulton suffered pharyngitis in August and again in October, but embarked at Sydney on His Majesty’s Australian Transport ship Euripides on October 31 1917, bound for Devonport England where he disembarked on Boxing Day 1917. He marched into No 4 training camp at Sutton Veny where he was based until March 31,1918. While there, he committed the “crime” of being absent from tattoo until 10.40 pm, and for this he was given three days punishment called FP no 2. On April 1, 1918 he proceeded overseas to France from Dover to Calais. His papers say that ‘he marched in from England and proceeded to his unit’.

HISTORY OF THE LIGHTHORSE Our parade this Anzac morning is led by Sergeant John Soutter of the Creswick Blue Returned Services League Light Horse Troop. This parade honours our soldiers and their courageous horses who gave their lives on the burning sands of the Middle East, and in the girth-deep mud of France and Belgium. Pioneers bred horses in the mountains, on the red gum plains of Gippsland, and on the vast stations in every state of Australia. These horses were a type from a draught-thoroughbred cross, the first of which produced a clumper. The second cross however, produced the cool head ,yet powerful frame of the Waler. Our Walers could haul guns, wagons and ambulances, and were also the chargers ridden by our Lighthorsemen. In the days of the Raj in India our horses were in strong demand. They were delivered in wooden ships by the young men who had broken and trained them. These were hazardous journeys. At home in peace time these horses were the backbone of rural Australia. World War 1 saw our Light Horse sail for the conflict with their Walers. Many took their own horses, companions of many years. In all, 169 thousand horses went overseas, and only one returned. That was ‘Sandy’, the mount of General Bridges who died from wounds suffered at Gallipoli. ‘Sandy’ lived out his life at the Army Remount Depot at Maribyrnong and was buried there. A memorial is being erected of a soldier carrying his saddle, surrounded by horseshoe-shaped gardens, with the flags of Australia, Victoria, New Zealand and the United Kingdom flying overhead. Many Buchan people including children, travelled to Broadmeadows to farewell our own boys before they sailed for the Middle East during World War 1. One of the children wrote describing the long lines of horses, and our local boys proud in their khaki uniforms and emu plumes. It was a highly emotional meeting and goodbye. The Light Horse charge as they galloped beneath the enemy guns and captured the Wells of Beersheba is unforgettable. We who ride and love our horses have a link with those who rode that day. We honour them all, especially those who paid the supreme sacrifice, and give thanks for the stamina and courage shown in our historic past by our own Australian Light Horse Regiments. Anzac Day 2011.   Clive’s address. * This year has a number of anniversaries which relate to Australia’s military history, for instance it is the 70th anniversary of the siege of Tobruk and the battles for Crete and Greece during WW2. * Tobruk, which has been in the news of late for different reasons, was the scene of the first big engagements by the sons of the Anzacs, the second generation of volunteer Diggers. They became known as the Rats of Tobruk. Their commander, Lt Gen Leslie Morshead a Victorian teacher was tasked to hold Tobruk against the German army commanded by Rommel. During the 8 months of the siege the Australians lost 559 killed, 2450 wounded and 941 taken prisoner. The defence of Tobruk laid the ground work for the battle of El Alamein which is seen a turning point in WW2 which the British PM, Churchill called the “turning of the Hinge of Fate”. * 2011 is also the centenary of the foundation of the RAN and the 90th anniversary of the foundation of the RAAF. * Whilst on the subject commemorations, many will know that 2015 will be the centenary of the landing at Gallipoli. A year ago the Federal Government announced the formation of a National Commission on the Commemoration of the Anzac Centenary. It’s report and recommendations were handed to the Government the other day and a member of the Commission, Malcolm Fraser at a later news conference announced that among other things was a recommendation that war memorials, particularly in rural areas be investigated with the view to renovation/restoration where decline in populations of townships made this necessary.

This year also saw the red and white mushroom Amanita muscaria, commonly known as the fly agaric or fly amanita, which  is often seen in children’s books come out on Anzac Day.

 

 

Anzac Day 2012

Our wettest year to date. David from the roadhouse read the ode at the dawn service.

Nigel Hodge spoke about the days on the land during WW2

I started school about the time when the war started and went permanently until 1940.
We were lucky to have teachers right through the war years even though it was mostly half time with Butchers Ridge.
Names of the Teachers we had
1. Ray Fyfe
2. Jim Egan
3. Neil smith
4. Jack Alexander
5. Warne
6. Doug Sprout
7. Peggy Gillies
8. Cliff Craig
9. James Devaney
10. Heather McDonnell
11. Fiona McDonnell
12. Alex Magill

I had 12 teachers in 7 years.
That was all the education l got. There was no Secondary Education within our reach.
Petrol rationing came in sometime in 1940 and by 1941 rations were 2000 miles per year per car. In June 1941 the Prime Minister reduced private motorist to 1000 miles per year. That would have limited our family to 6 trips to Bairnsdale per year.
Great Britain had 1500 miles and New Zealand 1600 miles per year
Rationing forced Australians to change their methods of transport. A lot of dairy farms went back to horse and cart to take milk and cream to a pick up point on main road. Housewife’s in cities went to push bikes to do their shopping.
Gas producers were fitted to a lot of cars but they were unsatisfactory and not popular. Refuelling with charcoal was a dirty process during the Labour Government of the 1940’s. Created Black dust also engine wear because of its dry dusty nature. Petrol rationing ended on 8th February 1950. End of petrol rationing was coalition government promise when they won government November 1949.
We never had a football as kids during the war as rubber and it seemed everything was used for the war effort. Most of the young people of my age suffered when playing football later in life most of us not good kicks because of not having practice as children.
Our parents would ring up Buchan Store and a lot of supplies were brought up in the mail car which was a utility mostly, 3 times a week. Lighting kerosene was brought on the mail in big square 4 gallon tins, two to a packing case made of pine boards.
Bread came in loaves from the bakery at Buchan rapped in brown paper. The mailman had to be careful where it was stacked and if it was too close to the kerosene you could have kero flavoured bread.
Mrs Peter McDonnell use to get a fresh loaf of bread on the mail every Thursday to have nice fresh bread for lunch.
One of the old characters in our area was a German called Harry Westphal. He did not like Mrs McDonnell and they had an argument over something. Harry caught a ride up to his hut on the Mail from Buchan one particular Thursday he sat on Mrs McDonnell’s loaf of bread all the way up to Butchers Ridge. The loaf looked like a big flat pancake with brown paper wrapping. Mrs McDonnell was not a happy lady at lunch time.
Children living on farms like us probably had it a lot easier than most because we had house, cows and vegie patch. We made our own butter and jams. Dad killed our meat from sheep and cattle we even ate kangaroo meat and rabbits also and had our own hens and eggs.
Tea and sugar was rationed. We as children did not drink tea until we left school. Clothing was rationed and Mother made a lot of our clothes, knitted socks, etc.
Our parents got flour in 3 bushel jute bags. Mum made bread with potato yeast she made herself. It would start fermenting with a little drop of beer which kept producing for about 3 months then went sour and she would start the process again with clean equipment.
Kerosene tins were used with the top cut out and a wire handle put in to heat water, etc. over open fires. Tins cut down to about 6 or 8 inches height were the bread tins for our mother.
I think the highlight for us kids during the war was the V.D.C. It was something like Dads Army in England. Every week local farmers and men from all ages gathered at the local hall on Butchers Creek for drill and training. Three returned solders from World War One were the instructors; Jock Rankin, Keith Rogers and Colin Hume. We kids used to get a stick and copy what the adults were doing. There were three men that never seemed to be able to march in step with the rest.

I think Jock Rankin was a retired Corporal from the Scottish Army. He could really bark out the orders. One day he pulled three out and called it the Awkward Squad put the three together and drilled them separately up and down the road blasting them with orders and saying left, right, l don’t think he was ever satisfied with the end result.
Towards the end of the war us school children were asked to collect as much aluminium as we could, old saucepans, lolly papers, anything aluminium no matter what it was. This was bagged and sent off to somewhere. It was some years after the war that l found out what they used it for, it was chopped into little pieces and spread from aircraft at night which stuffed up the German radar beams.

Anzac Day 2011

Anzac-Day-2011-poster-Tobruk_smlAnzac-Day-2011-poster-Greece_sml

Dawn Service 0545 – Gather at the Avenue -Old RSL flag at half mast 0600 – “Stand-To” and brief welcome by Clive Norfolk

0605 – Guest Speaker – Kevin Kneebone 0615 –  Hymn – Abide With Me

0620 – Prayer – Speaker  – Cassandra White, Rotary Award Student

0625 – The Ode, Last Post, 1 min silence, Reveille (Flag raised to masthead by Cassandra White)  and National Anthem

0630 – Cup of Tea.

BUCHAN PONY CLUB SERVICE Blue Ensign at half mast 08.30 Service at the Pony Club Venue  (Rec. Reserve) -note early time 0830 – Horses proceed through designated parade and assemble in front of the Rec Hall. 0840 – Welcome by Zillah Norfolk 0843 – Special Address – History of the Australian Lighthorse – guest speaker – to be advised. 0900 – The Ode – spoken by Jeff Mc Cole. Followed by The Last Post, 1 min silence, Reveille (Flag raised to masthead by Cody Woodgate) the National Anthem.

10.55 – AVENUE OF HONOUR WREATH LAYING Welcome by Zillah Norfolk-  Lay wreaths, Last Post, one minute silence, Reveille, National Anthem, finishing approx 11.05am.

OLIVER JACK POULTON Oliver Jack Poulton, a 21 year old farmer, fair with blue eyes, left his home in Turner’s Flat, McLeay River New South Wales, to enlist in the army. His mother Fanny Louise and his father John signed his enlistment papers for service abroad. Oliver signed up for the duration of the war plus four months, at Kempsey New South Wales, on April 25th 1917. (Coincidentally that is now Anzac Day.) He passed his medical examination and was ‘dentally finalized’ by June 1917. He was appointed to the 6th Lighthorse on June 18 at Menangle Park, and later to B Company 25th reinforcements 4th Battalion. Private Oliver Poulton suffered pharyngitis in August and again in October, but embarked at Sydney on His Majesty’s Australian Transport ship Euripides on October 31 1917, bound for Devonport England where he disembarked on Boxing Day 1917. He marched into No 4 training camp at Sutton Veny where he was based until March 31,1918. While there, he committed the “crime” of being absent from tattoo until 10.40 pm, and for this he was given three days punishment called FP no 2. On April 1, 1918 he proceeded overseas to France from Dover to Calais. His papers say that ‘he marched in from England and proceeded to his unit’.

HISTORY OF THE LIGHTHORSE Our parade this Anzac morning is led by Sergeant John Soutter of the Creswick Blue Returned Services League Light Horse Troop. This parade honours our soldiers and their courageous horses who gave their lives on the burning sands of the Middle East, and in the girth-deep mud of France and Belgium. Pioneers bred horses in the mountains, on the red gum plains of Gippsland, and on the vast stations in every state of Australia. These horses were a type from a draught-thoroughbred cross, the first of which produced a clumper. The second cross however, produced the cool head ,yet powerful frame of the Waler. Our Walers could haul guns, wagons and ambulances, and were also the chargers ridden by our Lighthorsemen. In the days of the Raj in India our horses were in strong demand. They were delivered in wooden ships by the young men who had broken and trained them. These were hazardous journeys. At home in peace time these horses were the backbone of rural Australia. World War 1 saw our Light Horse sail for the conflict with their Walers. Many took their own horses, companions of many years. In all, 169 thousand horses went overseas, and only one returned. That was ‘Sandy’, the mount of General Bridges who died from wounds suffered at Gallipoli. ‘Sandy’ lived out his life at the Army Remount Depot at Maribyrnong and was buried there. A memorial is being erected of a soldier carrying his saddle, surrounded by horseshoe-shaped gardens, with the flags of Australia, Victoria, New Zealand and the United Kingdom flying overhead. Many Buchan people including children, travelled to Broadmeadows to farewell our own boys before they sailed for the Middle East during World War 1. One of the children wrote describing the long lines of horses, and our local boys proud in their khaki uniforms and emu plumes. It was a highly emotional meeting and goodbye. The Light Horse charge as they galloped beneath the enemy guns and captured the Wells of Beersheba is unforgettable. We who ride and love our horses have a link with those who rode that day. We honour them all, especially those who paid the supreme sacrifice, and give thanks for the stamina and courage shown in our historic past by our own Australian Light Horse Regiments. Anzac Day 2011.  

Clive’s address. * This year has a number of anniversaries which relate to Australia’s military history, for instance it is the 70th anniversary of the siege of Tobruk and the battles for Crete and Greece during WW2. * Tobruk, which has been in the news of late for different reasons, was the scene of the first big engagements by the sons of the Anzacs, the second generation of volunteer Diggers. They became known as the Rats of Tobruk. Their commander, Lt Gen Leslie Morshead a Victorian teacher was tasked to hold Tobruk against the German army commanded by Rommel. During the 8 months of the siege the Australians lost 559 killed, 2450 wounded and 941 taken prisoner. The defence of Tobruk laid the ground work for the battle of El Alamein which is seen a turning point in WW2 which the British PM, Churchill called the “turning of the Hinge of Fate”. * 2011 is also the centenary of the foundation of the RAN and the 90th anniversary of the foundation of the RAAF. * Whilst on the subject commemorations, many will know that 2015 will be the centenary of the landing at Gallipoli. A year ago the Federal Government announced the formation of a National Commission on the Commemoration of the Anzac Centenary. It’s report and recommendations were handed to the Government the other day and a member of the Commission, Malcolm Fraser at a later news conference announced that among other things was a recommendation that war memorials, particularly in rural areas be investigated with the view to renovation/restoration where decline in populations of townships made this necessary.

This year also saw the red and white mushroom Amanita muscaria, commonly known as the fly agaric or fly amanita, which  is often seen in children’s books come out on Anzac Day.

Anzac Day 2009

PROGRAMME – ZILLAH’S NOTES

10.15     Flag at half mast.

10.30 Those who wish to, gather at the Aleppo Pine and walk back to the gates, to the strains of VERA LYNN.

Zillah Norfolk welcomes all present.

Welcome everyone. Welcome to Anzac Day at Buchan South.

Since Remembrance Day last year, when there was one memorial garden seat on the avenue, six more were commissioned by interested people, and have been constructed and placed by Jamie Houghton.

We have also received an unexpected grant from DSE for three more, which will provide seating outside the Avenue where we hold these ceremonies. Obviously we are reaching saturation point with this project, and the Committee will be considering other memorial projects in the coming year, hopefully as popular as this one has been.

 This poster, which was used this year to advertise Anzac Day at Buchan South, reminds us of the 10th Anniversary of INTERFET – a United Nations peacekeeping effort, which stands for INTERNATIONAL FORCE FOR EAST TIMOR.

In 1975 Indonesia invaded the former Portuguese colony of East Timor. After almost 25 years of bloodshed in the territory, a new Indonesian government under President Habibie agreed to allow the East Timorese to vote on their future. UNAMET which is the United Nations Assistance Mission to East Timor, was established by the United Nations on June 11 1999 to organise and conduct the ballot in order to ascertain whether the East Timor people accepted or rejected the proposed constitutional framework providing for a special autonomy for East Timor within the Republic of Indonesia. The ballot was conducted on 30th August 1999 and the people voted strongly against autonomy under Indonesia, and to begin a process of transition towards independence. In the wake of the ballot much violence occurred. Many East Timorese were killed and as many as 500,000 were displaced from their homes. About half left the territory, some by force.

In September 1999, the United Nations authorised INTERFET, headed by Australia, to restore peace and security in East Timor, protect and support UNAMET in carrying out its tasks and facilitate humanitarian assistance operations. About 5500 Australian troops were sent to East Timor as part of Australia’s contribution to the multinational force, commanded by Major General Peter Cosgrove. At the beginning of its operations, INTERFET airdropped supplies of food and medicine and protected convoys carrying aid workers, making sure supplies got to the East Timorese people. By November 1999, 22 other nations had contributed to INTERFET including the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, New Zealand, Britain, United States and Canada.

Today, in spite of continuing internal strife, East Timor is independent.

And that is the background to this poster.

 Earlier this year, among other adventures, Clive and I visited Villers Bretonneux and Fromelles in France. I don’t think I have ever been anywhere so emotionally powerful.

Clive has a few things to say about it. Clive Norfolk Secretary of the Friends of the Avenue of Honour.

Clive Norfolk – short address about residents of Villers-Bretonneux’s donation to Victoria’s bushfire appeal.

Guest Speaker – Cr Peter Neal.

Around the year 1920 my Mum and Mick Butterworth used to play with the Neal kids at Stonehenge. I have some photos of that time. I know that those Neal kids were close relatives of our Guest Speaker, and I am sad that Mum and Mick are not here today to share our pleasure in welcoming Councillor Peter Neal.

Thank you Peter.

 Placing of Wreaths.

While the wreaths are being placed, I’d like to invite you all to morning tea after the ceremony. Thank you to the Golf ladies for organising that with the help of the Heritage Group.  At that time you might also like to have a look at the photographic record of the ceremonies held at Buchan South. This album has just been completed, ready for the photos taken today. Please also be sure to sign the visitors book. These books are an important record of the development of the Avenue of Honour.

ODE. Clive Norfolk to recite.

The Ode.

The ode comes from FOR THE FALLEN a poem by the English poet and writer Laurence Binyon, which was first published in the London newspaper, The Times, on 21 September 1914. The verse, which became the Ode of Remembrance, has been used in association with commemoration services in Australia since 1921.

 They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;

Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn,

At the going down of the sun and in the morning

We will remember them.

 Audience: We will remember them.

Last Post, One minute Silence, and Reveille.  – Clive Norfolk to raise the flag assisted by student or child present.

National Anthem

Morning Tea.

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Planting of the Aleppo Pine 2006

On Saturday the 23rd of September the old Buchan RSL flag flew proudly from the oak trees of the Buchan South Avenue of Honour as a group of past and present locals gathered to witness the planting of an Aleppo Pine tree. The tree was planted by Zillah Roach with the help of her brother Mick Butterworth. Zillah, now in her 90s, was a student at the Buchan South State School in the early 1920s when the children planted the oak trees of the avenue to honour the Buchan South men who went to the First World War. A third of these men made the supreme sacrifice. The Avenue of Honour has survived for nearly 80 years as a sentinel to these brave men.

The Aleppo Pine planted at the eastern end of the avenue is a descendant of the original Lone Pine Tree from Gallipoli and was donated by Ron King from the East Keilor branch of the RSL. It commemorates the 91st anniversary of the Battle of Lone Pine. Lone Pine was a heavily fortified Turkish position eventually taken by the Australians after heavy fighting and the loss of many men. It was identified by a solitary pine tree which did not survive the battle but later when the Australians were evacuating Gallipoli, a soldier collected a cone and brought it back to Australia. From the seeds of this cone, several seedlings were struck.

Over 45 people attended, some from as far away as Orbost and Bairnsdale and many related to the original Anzacs who feature on the Honour Roll in the old Buchan South arts room now re-located in the Buchan School.

This important and unique historical site is now undergoing restoration through the hard work of the ‘Friends of the Buchan South Avenue of Honour’ under the guidance of Clive Norfolk who is also a returned serviceman and a member of the Buchan Heritage Group. Plans are also underway to reintroduce the Anzac Day Ceremony in the district at this venue in 2007.

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